90th Infantry Division, U.S. Army Divisions of World War II

 
Name:90th
Type:Infantry
Nickname:Tough ‘Ombres
Source:Organized Reserves
Theater: European
Activation Date:25 Mar 42
Date Sent Overseas:4 Apr 44 (England)
Date Entered Combat:9 Jun 44 (Normandy)
Days of Combat:308
Casualties:19,200
Status June 1946:inactivated 27 Dec 45
Other Wars:WW I
Commanding General(s): Maj. Gen. Henry Terrell, Jr.    (Mar 42 - Jan 44)
Brig. Gen. Jay W. MacKelvie    (Jan 44 - Jul 44)
Maj. Gen. Eugene M. Landrum    (Jul 44 - Aug 44)
Maj. Gen. Raymond S. McLain    (Aug 44 - Oct 44)
Maj. Gen. James A. Van Fleet    (Oct 44 - Feb 45)
Maj. Gen. Lowell W. Rooks    (Feb 45 - Mar 45)
Maj. Gen. Herbert L. Earnest    (Mar 45 - Nov 45)
 
Campaign(s): Normandy    (6 Jun 44 - 24 Jul 44)
Northern France    (25 Jul 44 - 14 Sep 44)
Rhineland    (15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45)
Ardennes-Alsace    (16 Dec 44 - 25 Jan 45)
Central Europe    (22 Mar 45 - 11 May 45)

Brief History:
The 90th Infantry Division landed in England, 5 April 1944, and trained from 10 April to 4 June. First elements of the Division saw action on Dday, 6 June, on Utah Beach, Normandy, the remainder entering combat, 10 June, cutting across the Merderet River to take Pont l'Abbe in heavy fighting. After defensive action along the Douve, the Division attacked to clear the Foret de Mont Castre, clearing it by 11 July, in spite of fierce resistance. An attack on the island of Seves failing, 23 July, the 90th bypassed it and took Periers, 27 July. On 12 August, the Division drove across the Sarthe River, north and east of Le Mans, and took part in the closing of the Falaise Gap, taking Chambois, 19 August. It then raced across France, through Verdun, 6 September, to participate in the siege of Metz, 14 September-19 November, capturing Maizieres les Metz, 30 October, and crossing the Moselle at Koenigsmacker, 9 November. On. 6 December 1944, the Division pushed across the Saar and established a bridgehead north of Saarlautern, 618 December, but with the outbreak of the Von Rundstedt drive, withdrew to the west bank on 19 December, and went on the defensive until 5 January 1945, when it shifted to the scene of the Ardennes struggle. It drove across the Our, near Oberhausen, 29 January, to establish and expand a bridgehead. In February, the Division smashed through Siegfried fortifications to the Prum River. After a short rest, the 90th continued across the Moselle to take Mainz, 22 March, and crossed the Rhine, the Main, and the Werra in rapid succession. Pursuit continued to the Czech border, 18 April 1945, and into the Sudeten hills. The Division was en route to Prague when the war in Europe ended.

Notes:
Activation date is the date the division was activated or inducted into federal service (national guard units).
Casualties are number of killed, wounded in action, captured, and missing.
Other Wars are the wars in which the division was mobilized.
The dates after the campaign name are the dates of the campaign not of the division.

Sources: The Army Almanac: A Book of Facts Concerning the Army of the United States; , U.S. Government Printing Office. Army Battle Casualties and Nonbattle Deaths in World War II, Final Report, 1 December 1941 - 31 December 1946.